Tag Archive: Environment


The Happening

The girls and I have been sick all week so tonight, Erick rented some movies for us to enjoy.   We watched Monster House with the girls and then after they went to bed, we enjoyed the latest M. Night Shyamalan’s film, The Happening.  Well, it wasn’t exactly “enjoyment” we were experiencing through some truly gruesome death scenes, but I was again thrilled with Shyamalan’s ability to look past the obvious and reach into our deepest sub-conscience for another winning story-line.  

Though a bit rough around the edges, this film makes a firm statement about the state of our planet and offers up the last resort tactic of some truly unexpected antagonists.  Yeah, the neurotoxins were a bit refined on their first attempt, but they accomplish the end-result of so many chemicals we spray without consideration on our lawns, countertops, trees, pets, and in our water each day.  And it’s equally ugly and no less terrifying.  

[And in case you’re wondering, plants really do communicate with other species in a similar way described in the film.]

I prefer this film to Lady in the Water for story-line, but I felt like Zoey’s character really lacked depth in this film, so in terms of acting, Lady wins out.  The Village remains my favorite M. Night film.

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Fueling the argument

I’m 29 years old. I purchased my first gallon of gas for around $0.79 at age 16. Ten years later, I was paying $2.49/gallon. Today, a gallon of gasoline (regular unleaded) is $4.18 at the pump; a 430% increase over my first gallon.

Some get mad at the price. They point fingers at oil companies making record profits or at President Bush (the worst president ever) and his oil buddies or they blame the war. And they (we) should be angry, but what really angers me is the feeling that we’ll allow this rise in prices to continue unabated until our country bursts at the seams with inflation. The oil companies have a hand in everything we do from driving to work to taking a much-needed, well-deserved vacation. We had a choice in the 1970s when we saw the first dramatic spike in oil, but we sat idling in the great parking-lots of centers of energy and policy. And we have the same choice today, but for some reason, the technologies are slow-moving. Why are hybrids still too costly for the lower middle class? What does it mean when in America, the cost of driving to work, does not warrant the job itself? And today there’s more at stake than just the price of gas, we must consider also the cost of driving. What impact will current and future technologies have on our environment and well-being? So I’m not just frustrated with big oil, I’m frustrated with us. We’re not the only country in the world importing oil, but we a great country on the fragile brink of economic collapse because of a severe lack of foresight.

I’m asking now for those readers who do not normally comment, to consider posting ideas for free-energy, education, the economy, etc. We don’t need to fuel the argument; we need to power a solution.